Your questions about retirement planning boiled down to 20 answers

Richard Quinn

MarketWatch

Take any money issue and you’re sure to find detailed guidance—some so complicated that it’s largely ignored, regardless of its potential benefit.

The following is not intended to make light of the difficulty some people have with money. Still, a little straightforward information helps. Let’s strip personal finance down to its basics:

BlackRock Global Investment Outlook: Q4 update

BlackRock Global Investment Outlook: Q4 update

BlackRock Investment Institute

Click here for the full report

Overall, we favor reducing risk amid the ongoing protectionist push. We prefer U.S. equities for their reasonable valuations and relatively high quality; and the min vol and quality factors for their defensive properties. We like EM debt for its coupon income. We are overweight euro area sovereigns: a relatively steeper yield curve brightens their appeal even at low yields. And we see government bonds as important portfolio stabilizers.

Roth IRA Beats Traditional IRA For Young Workers; Here's How

PAUL KATZEFF

Investors Business Daily

Roth IRAs are best for workers who expect their tax rate to rise in retirement. And the younger you are, the more likely that is to be true. So, if you're a young investor, remember: a Roth IRA is a savings tool whose benefits tilt in your favor.

Here’s Why Small Investors Aren’t Buying the ‘Index Funds Bubble’ Argument

Kevin Kelleher

Fortune

You may have heard the ever-louder debate recently emanating from the world of Big Finance on whether equity index funds and ETFs are heading for a bubble. Small investors, like families saving for college or retirement, are also weighing in on the matter—and their response seems to be an indifferent shrug of the shoulders.

It’s Time For Year-End Financial Planning

Kristin McKenna

Forbes

Getting your finances ready for the end of the calendar year takes time, so it’s wise to start thinking about your financial to-do list now. Since most year-end planning opportunities have firm deadlines—often December 31st—acting now can help ensure you don’t leave money on the table. It’s not all upside though: failing to take certain actions can mean hefty penalties in some cases.

Shift into value stocks could fuel a solid rally, says J.P. Morgan

Barbara Kollmeyer

MarketWatch

Bone up on the term “market rotation” if you want to hold your own at the water cooler these days.

Deutsche Bank strategist Jim Reid and his team define that term best as a “big unwind in some popular trades.” In the last couple of days, investors have been intensely pulling money out of momentum stocks — those that have had the best returns over the past year — and into so-called slow-and-steady value stocks. It’s sort of like trading your pet hare for a tortoise.

Early retirement sounds amazing, but it can take a toll on your mental health

Karishma Vanjani

MarketWatch

Having enough money in the bank and the potential to never work an office job again excites many people on the journey to FIRE, but they often overlook the possible downsides.

5 Questions to Ask When Taking a Hands-On Approach to Your 401(k)

Christine Benz

Morningstar

More and more 401(k) investors are opting to be hands-off. A recent report by the Investment Company Institute and the Employee Benefits Research Institute found that more than half of 401(k) participants were invested in a target-date fund at the end of 2016.

But not all 401(k) participants are following that trend. Just 21% of all 401(k) assets are in target-date funds, so many 401(k) investors have clearly opted to take a hands-on approach with at least a portion of their portfolios.

The 5 Biggest Retirement Mistakes to Avoid

Greg O’Donnell

Kiplinger

The road to retirement is full of obstacles, but knowing what lies ahead can help you successfully overcome them. Think of a retirement plan as a road map (in the days before GPS) that will help you avoid wrong turns, like not taking advantage of a 401(k), forgetting about significant costs in retirement, and forgetting about your desired retirement lifestyle.

Investors Are Fleeing Emerging Markets Stocks as Trade War Heats Up

Anne Sraders

Fortune

In the on-going saga of Trump's trade war with China, emerging markets are getting the short end of the stick.

Emerging markets (EM) net capital flows reached negative $35.8 billion in June, according to data from the Institute of International Finance. To boot, investors had already pulled some net $19 billion out of EM as of the month before.

Have We Seen The Top Of The Stock Market? Probably Not


Erik Conley

Seeking Alpha

It's been an ugly week, but we've seen uglier. Market down 5 of the last 7 days. But we're only 2.4% below the most recent high water mark. In the grand scheme, that's nothing. I expect the bulls to mount another charge and once again take the high ground. But let's face it - this bull is tired. It needs fuel (a catalyst) if it's going to keep going higher.

Here are the Best New Ideas in Retirement

Jeremy Olshan

Marketwatch

Ten thousand Americans retire every day. And they do it in 10,000 different ways.

With such infinite possibility comes boundless anxiety, which is why no financial rite of passage inspires more hope — or dread — than retirement.

What does retirement even mean in 2019? To many, it still marks the beginning of the end of life, a ride off into the Sun Belt in a golf cart (or hearse). But now that we are living, working and loving longer than ever before, retirement might be better described as the end of midlife. The typical retirement lasts decades, far longer than we spend in school, longer even than some careers.

How Bonds Can Rob $400K From Your Retirement Planning And Savings

PAUL KATZEFF

Investor’s Business Daily

In a recent column, we looked at how relatively easy it is for a 25-year-old to save well above $1 million by age 70 in a 401(k) account. But to succeed, you must avoid committing a common gaffe: allocating too much to bonds and cash too soon. That mistake can torpedo the best retirement planning.

You Should Be Saving at Least 12% of Your Pay for Retirement. Here's Why

CARLA FRIED

Money

To reach retirement in solid financial shape, you likely need to up your savings game today.

Vanguard reports that the median 401(k) contribution of American workers is 6% of pay. After adding in the median company matching contribution, the total workers are setting aside falls just short of 10%.

That may not be enough. Vanguard recommends a total contribution rate of between 12% to 15% of salary.

56% of Americans don’t know how much they need to retire—here’s why that’s a problem

Emmie Martin

CNBC

More than half (56%) of American adults don’t know how much money they’ll need to retire, according to data from Northwestern Mutual’s 2019 Planning & Progress Study.

That’s alarming. Without understanding how much money they’ll actually need, many people are failing to effectively save for retirement, Emily Holbrook, senior director of planning at Northwestern Mutual, tells CNBC Make It.